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FED UP: The Canadian seafood boycott

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Emy Will

Emy Will

Greetings from Johannesburg, South Africa. Although I have a doctorate in psychotherapy, my main passion is advocating for nonhuman animal rights. I condemn all cruelty to nonhuman animals and therefore follow a vegan lifestyle. I would like to connect with other animal activists from all over the world. The fur trade is one of the most abhorrent practices on this planet. Innocent animals are subjected to prolonged suffering for a trivial fashion item. As the chairperson of Fur Free SA. we campaign towards ending the global fur industry. This might not happen in my lifetime, but even if I leave one footprint behind, that is one step closer to the goal. This blog is a forum to discuss all aspects of the fur industry. It also raises issues around animal activism in general. Johannesburg is a crazy city and I need to escape from time to time. This photo was taken next to the magnificent Zambezi river.

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Seafood boycott

In support of animal rights I often  boldly state, “I will never shop here again”, only to be met with a “tell someone who cares” look. While I may feel better after flouncing out the shop, I know deep down that my statement is not going to make a difference. Now if I could get a whole group of people to boycott a place, that might work. Boycotts, as a form of mass action, are another way of putting pressure on  governments and businesses to change a policy or practice.

There must be a significant amount of participants for a boycott to work. This is why I did not even try to organise a boycott of The Firs Retail Centre, where Eric Fischer Furriers is a tenant. 

See post: https://emynow.wordpress.com/2013/07/22/that-moment-of-knowing/.

While consumer boycotts played a role in ending apartheid in South Africa, shoppers were not going to give up eating and buying at their favourite mall just because I asked them to.

A success story is the Canadian seafood boycott, which is gaining in momentum.

What’s it all about?

More than 6,000 restaurants and grocery stores, in addition to 800,000 individuals, have joined the Protect Seals boycott of Canadian seafood. This is part of the Humane Society of the United States’ Protect Seals Campaign. To date more than 40 local chefs have joined “Chefs for Seals”. Chefs from other parts of the world are participating by refusing to source seafood from Canada. They are protesting against the cruel practice of bludgeoning and killing seals. This boycott will continue until the annual seal hunt is stopped.

This sentiment is echoed by Mike Isabella, seen here in his chef’s coat.                                                                                        chef                                                                                                                                                                                        

Read more: http://www.king5.com/news/Chefs-for-Seals-203480351.html                     

As a consumer you can participate by not buying food products from Canada.                                                                                      

canadian_tin2

For those of us who do not eat fish;             there is also the boycott on Canadian maple syrup.                                                    mapel syrup

                                                         These links explain the economics behind this boycott

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2 Comments

  1. Chris says:

    Consumer boycotts can be enormously powerful. A boycott of sugar by English consumers was a major factor in leading to the outlawing of the slave trade, as this was the primary British industry which used slave labour. .

    Like

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