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NEWS FROM São Paulo

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Emy Will

Emy Will

Greetings from Johannesburg, South Africa. Although I have a doctorate in psychotherapy, my main passion is advocating for nonhuman animal rights. I condemn all cruelty to nonhuman animals and therefore follow a vegan lifestyle. I would like to connect with other animal activists from all over the world. The fur trade is one of the most abhorrent practices on this planet. Innocent animals are subjected to prolonged suffering for a trivial fashion item. As the chairperson of Fur Free SA. we campaign towards ending the global fur industry. This might not happen in my lifetime, but even if I leave one footprint behind, that is one step closer to the goal. This blog is a forum to discuss all aspects of the fur industry. It also raises issues around animal activism in general. Johannesburg is a crazy city and I need to escape from time to time. This photo was taken next to the magnificent Zambezi river.

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ASIA

The following article was published in asiaone world October 31st 2014Brazil's Sao Paulo state bans rearing fur animals

SAO PAULO – Chinchillas, mink and other fur animals can no longer be raised for their pelts under a new measure in the wealthy Brazilian state of Sao Paulo.

Animals bred for the fashion industry are highly stressed, mistreated and “kept in cages that are so small they cannot even move properly,” the law says.

“All this cruelty makes fashion that uses animal fur immoral and unjustifiable.”

According to the state government, Brazil is one of the biggest chinchilla producers in the world, behind Argentina.

The law aims to protect animals whose fur is used for coats and other fashion accessories, including rabbits, foxes, mink, badgers, seals, coyotes, squirrels and chinchillas.

Those violating the law will face fines exceeding 10,000 reais (S$5,300), an amount that doubles in the case of a second offence.

Each chinchilla pelt fetches about $60. A knee-length coat might require as many as 200 animals.

Fur farmers not surprisingly fought the new law. According to a report in the Folha de Sao Paulo newspaper, one farmer has already begun killing 1,500 female chinchillas to stop them from reproducing.

“The law is going to be approved. For us, it’s over,” chinchilla growers’ association chief Carlos Peres told the paper.

State Governor Geraldo Alckmin approved the bill Tuesday. It was published in the local official newspaper a day later.

In mid-October, a group of Animal Liberation Front activists broke into a Sao Paulo chinchilla farm and rescued about 100 of the creatures.

Activists in the state raided a pharmaceutical lab in October 2013, and rescued dogs being used in tests.

Animal testing for cosmetics, perfumes and personal hygiene products was banned here in January.

– See more at: http://news.asiaone.com/news/world/brazils-sao-paulo-state-bans-rearing-fur-animals#sthash.gHnhLxcl.dpuf

Brazil and chinchillas chinchilla pelts.

BRAZIL IS SEEN AS ONE OF THE LEADING COUNTRIES IN SUPPLYING CHINCHILLA FUR TO THE WORLD MARKET.

AS LONG AS THERE IS A DEMAND FOR FUR, THERE WILL BE A SUPPLY.

PLEASE EDUCATE PEOPLE ABOUT THE CRUEL AND SENSELESS  FUR TRADE.

 

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5 Comments

  1. Dionysus Amber says:

    Reblogged this on Freedom For Cetaceans.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. This is wonderful news on both horrific industries.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Emy Will says:

      Hi Carmen 🙂 It is good news for a change. I just wish the rest of world would follow suit, but this will only happen when people refuse to buy products that involve animal cruelty.
      Take care,
      Emy

      Liked by 1 person

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